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OUR STORY

The Waterfront has been an attraction for visitors since the 1950’s. Back then the gravel road from town ended at the Waterfront where a general store and fuel pump were once located. Cottages were once dotted along this section of the Inlet and were very popular due to this unique waterfront setting with its natural beauty nestled among the native karris.

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The site has continued to thrive as a tourism destination undergoing several upgrades including the addition of a restaurant in 1999.   The Waterfront was earmarked for a major development around 2010 however this failed to eventuate. In late 2021 the property was acquired by the owners of Pelicans at Denmark who set about consolidating the fifteen land titles into one marking the first time in over 3 decades that the Waterfront had been held by one entity. This fact laid the foundation for a significant upgrade.

On site renovations commenced in 2022 with a workforce involving local trades backed up by a friendly band of travelling nomads. At the outset the echoes of time seemed to linger in every corner where cobwebs and insects had flourished on neglect. New roofing, ceilings, lighting, paintwork, bedding and decor have now re-vitalised this venue creating a welcoming lodge like environment befitting its pedigree.

An integral component of the “Waterfront” experience is the karri tree.  Here these majestic trees run to the Inlet edge (3 metres from the high-water mark), their tall canopies creating a truly captivating setting. Unique to the southern region of Western Australia, karri trees, were described by an “amazed” Bill Bryson as “some of the mightiest trees on earth, of consummate and singular beauty” (p299 In a Sunburned Country). The karri, which derives its name from early Aboriginal inhabitants, is WA’s tallest tree and one of the tallest hardwood trees in the world growing up to 80 metres during its average 300-year lifespan.

Those magnificent karri trees have been pruned for your safety; the grounds and gardens landscaped, and ranch style fencing installed to retain the private nature of the site for our guests. New signage has been added and the grounds illuminated during the evening. Against the backdrop of a global pandemic the restoration project is nearing completion, and it is pleasing to see the Waterfront restored to its former glory.

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We understand the impact our operations can have on the environment and neighbourhood. Our setting abounds with nature. Over 68 different species of birdlife having been recorded on our grounds along with kangaroos in their native environment. For this reason, we do not accommodate pets. We strive to provide a quiet and serene haven for our guests who are mainly couples exploring the Great Southern Region. Our rooms are all non-smoking.

An integral component of the “Waterfront” experience is the karri tree.  Here these majestic trees run to the Inlet edge (3 metres from the high-water mark), their tall canopies creating a truly captivating setting. Unique to the southern region of Western Australia, karri trees, were described by an “amazed” Bill Bryson as “some of the mightiest trees on earth, of consummate and singular beauty” (p299 In a Sunburned Country). The karri, which derives its name from early Aboriginal inhabitants, is WA’s tallest tree and one of the tallest hardwood trees in the world growing up to 80 metres during its average 300-year lifespan.

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